Being Inquisitive: A Point of favor towards employment


DOS AND DON’T’S OF ASKING QUESTIONS DURING INTERVIEW

By: Noriel E. Banes


It is human nature to ask if something is vague or needs further explanation. Same goes during interviews. It is expected for the candidate to ask as many questions as possible to the interviewer. Being inquisitive can be an additional point for a candidate towards landing a job. However, being inquisitive can also put you in deep waters and it may mean a red flag for the hiring personnel. Having said that, we should filter the questions we should ask during the interview. Below are the dos and don’ts in asking questions:

1.       Ask for a professional development plan. It is just right to ask about the plans that the company has in store for you. It only shows that your interest in joining the company is not just about the salary but a professional development that you can look forward to. There’s no harm in asking because it is your right as a candidate to know your future in the company especially in terms of professional growth.

2.       Don’t ask questions that have already been answered. Sometimes when we force ourselves to think of questions for the sake of asking, we tend to ask a non-sensible one. A tendency is, we ask something that we already know the answer of we ask repeatedly those that have been discussed during the interview. Avoid it once and for all because you will sound ridiculous and someone who has a lack of listening abilities.

3.       Ask for your goals and what is expected of you. There are times when verifications are needed especially if the job description is a bit vague and you need clarifications. You may ask this kind of question for you to know very well the things that you have to do in order to be successful in your position. The set goals and target are best ways to motivate employees and will be a deciding factor for you whether to accept the job or not. Having a clear goal and the things that are expected of you to do can make your stay in a company a meaningful career journey.

4.       Don’t ask how many candidates are being interviewed. This is perhaps a big NO to ask an interviewer. Apparently, it is not your business if the employer has dozens of interviews to conduct. You are there to do your best in the interview and present yourself the best ways possible to make them like you. “Asking this kind of question will give the interviewer an impression that you are a little naive and that it raises a question what your purpose is of asking and it is quite awkward,” Said Alison Green.

5.       Make follow-up questions if necessary. To make things straight, it is just right to ask clarifications if necessary. It is a privilege that’s given to the candidates as that will give you an opportunity to understand the information. It will also give the interviewer an idea that you are really interested in getting the job. Someone who does not give a damn about anything is an indication of being disinterested.


6.       Don’t ask general questions. This is point will give you another idea that general questions limit the information that you can get from the interviewer. If you wanted to find out more details, be specific with your questions. It should not be a Yes or No question as it will not generate a good clear result. Also, specific questions or open-ended questions build thorough discussions and it can build rapport between the candidate and the interviewer. If you want to be successful with your interview, make sure that you are conversant enough to throw questions that are worth discussing.


Many candidates should be aware that asking questions is crucial to landing a job. You can show your interest by asking sensible questions and that will give a point for your favor. I am sure that there will be thousands of questions in your mind, but you can filter them out by choosing the right ones. Make sure that you’ll get the answer you’re looking for because it will benefit you as someone who is seeking a better career.


“The Art and Science of asking questions is the source of all knowledge.” – Thomas Berger