These 6 Phrases Can Kill Office Productivity in your Workplace

IDIOMATIC EXPRESSIONS THAT WILL LEAVE PEOPLE CONFUSED




This article is authored by Sir Neb.

“I cannot stand the fact that our performance this month is very bad and it seems to go over my head. It appears to me that you don’t pull your weight. We should start asking ourselves what went wrong and which part we fall short or else, we’ll all be lost in the woods. “



Fancy, isn’t it? But let me tell you this, your words may be high sounding but they aren't working in a professional arena.

      1.      Go over my head. Means something that is out of your comprehension or something that you can’t understand. There are easier ways to say this that won’t leave your colleagues confused. Be direct to the point.

      2.      Pull your weight. It means that you are not doing your job as expected or that you are lazy. Idioms are good to coat offenses but it is worse because it will make them misunderstood you sometimes. The thing is, being straightforward in constant gentleness with the words will help them recognize your thoughts effectively.

      3.      Lost in the woods. It means to be in deep trouble. Your colleagues or constituents will really be in a deep trouble if they don’t understand what you are trying to say.



“Our office seemed to be very adaptable with governance. It seemed that they have the master’s degree in office politics and that it is very hard to move up the ranks especially if you are not buttering someone up.”


      1.      Office Politics. This phrase refers to someone using his power to influence to get advantages for themselves.  

      2.      Move up the ranks. It means to be promoted or get a higher position.

      3.      Buttering someone up. This phrase connotes a negative meaning. It means doing nice things or good things to people in order for you to get their favor.



I know there are a lot of idioms and fancy ways to express our ideas but a workplace is not a talking novel. We always say what we mean and we always mean what we say. A professional place like your office is a place where there should be an effective communication which everybody understands. It is not the right place to showcase your intelligence in idioms or high sounding words that you know. There is a perfect time and a perfect place for all that.



Do you know a boss who uses a lot of idioms which may confuse workers? Are there more idioms you can add up to the list?

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